April 22, 2016 by songmagnifier 2 Comments. Incidentally her Rabbit friend seems to do the same as she ditches society for the woods 6 months a year. Thought that was a good solution [2] The US video features Amos driving a truck full of women around a typical American desert. When the protagonist tries to tell herself “This is not really happening”, then says “You bet your life it is,”  you can hear the desperation in her voice. Yes, Anastasia. You bet your life it is                                                                                                                                                Â. [2], The reference to corn flakes and raisins comes from their distribution in a box of breakfast cereal, implying that "raisin girls" are much harder to find than "cornflake girls".  In the song Rabbit is placed in contrast to the “man with the golden gun” who really doesn’t know so much – likely taken from the assassin/bad guy character in the James Bond novel and film of the same name.  The man could represent all men, who are otherwise left out of this song’s story, and it could also signify the leaders of the patriarchy being dependent upon the women who choose evil. Before diving head first into the song, it is worth noting a little tidbit about the origin of Corn Flakes. In the late 19th century, John Harvey Kellogg, M.D., a deeply religious man who practiced celibacy even in his marriage, invented Corn Flakes as a breakfast food that would prevent masturbation and curb the sex drive.  At the sanitarium that he ran he also encouraged certain forms of genital mutilation in people with more elevated sex drives.  While we can’t know whether Amos knew this about the flakes, it is likely she did, given the connection to Walker’s book as inspiration for the song. inspiration for \"Cornflake Girl\" came from a conversation she was having with a longtime friend about female genital mutilation in Africa I am taking a turn at “Cornflake Girl,”a song that has eluded me for years, in hopes that my readers will offer additional insights and information so that I will grow to understand it better. From the Album: Tori Amos - Cornflake Girl [US CD Single #2] From the Book: Tales of a Librarian: A Tori Amos Collection. Peaking at number seven on the US Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100, "Cornflake Girl" also experienced commercial success worldwide. If I recall from earlier interviews, Tori had used the term with either her assistant or makeup artist (or someone like that) for the type of female that is false and a betrayer (refer to David Stewart’s answer to your question). Additionally, the  line “Rabbit – where’d you put the keys girl?” makes me think of someone who is trying to grab her friend’s keys to stop her from leaving a party. Cloud On My Tongue. Two separate "Cornflake Girl" CD singles were released in the UK. Fun Fact:   Tori Amos participated in a Kellogg’s cereal commercial before she became famous.  The item she was promoting, “Just Right” cereal, had cornflakes and raisins in its blend.Â. To declare your preference for "soft" or "soggy" cornflakes is to express a desire to branch out as a musician and explore the possibilities of artistic maturation. I know it’s so easy So if it follows directly in its meaning then this line is simply the protagonist’s exclamation to the other raisin girls that this betrayal has happened – a warning knell if you will.  But in Amos’ lyrics she uses the word “peel,” which changes the phrase’s meaning.  I see two possible interpretations of the word “peel” here.  Instead of ringing out the watchword, the peel could be a removal of the code word – this might suggest a rejection of the exclusive behavior of the cornflake girls.  But upon closer inspection it is evident that her lyrics are also deeply layered, with single words and phrases often suggesting multiple meanings. "Cornflake Girl" is a song by American singer–songwriter and musician Tori Amos. In interviews Amos has stated that “Rabbit” is a female friend whom she looks up to, who lives 6 months of the year with her female partner “Fox” in a remote wooded location in Oregon. Inspiration and meaning. Honey. She’s puttin’ on her string bean love, This is not really happening  The inspiration for "Cornflake Girl" came from a conversation she was having with a long time friend about female genital mutilation on the African continent, specifically how a close female family member would betray the victim by performing the procedure. In verse 1 Amos describes getting the rug pulled out from under her.  She hadn’t thought that a raisin girl would turn on her.  She uses the phrase “Yo Heave Ho” to describe the woman’s leaving.  “Yo Heave Ho” was an actual song sung by sailors to keep rhythm while lifting together – but a “heave-ho” is also a throwing out or rejection, so here we see Amos’ word play in action, with a phrase underscoring that the leaving was done to a group that had previously been in step with one another. NEW SONG: Rod Wave - POP SMOKE - "MOOD SWINGS" ft. Lil Tjay - LYRICS; The 18 Greatest Revenge Songs of All Time; NEW SONG: Shawn Mendes - "Wonder" - LYRICS; 27 Best Ever Songs From Movie Soundtracks; Rabbit, where'd you put the keys, girl Rabbit, where'd you put the keys, girl Rabbit, where'd you put the keys, … A source of contention between Norwegian black metal musicians. Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Never was a cornflake girl Thought that was a good solution Hanging with the raisin girls She's gone to the other side Giving us a yo heave ho Things are getting kind of gross And I go at sleepy time This is not really happening You bet your life it is [3x] Peal out the watchword Just peal out the watchword She knows what's going on She was inspired to write the song after reading Rabbit where’d you put the keys girl? 209 – Week Ending 13th February 1994)", "NME > Tori Amos – The Story Behind 'Cornflake Girl – Classic Song", "tori amos just right cornflake commercial", "Tori Amos' Real-Life Stint as a Cornflake Girl", The Irish Charts – Search Results – Cornflake Girl", "Íslenski Listinn Topp 40 (24.03.1994 – 30.03.1994)", Australian-charts.com – Tori Amos – Cornflake Girl", "Blender Magazine – 500 Greatest Songs From 1980–2005 (Music Database :: Dave Tompkins)", Ultratop.be – Tori Amos – Cornflake Girl", Offiziellecharts.de – Tori Amos – Cornflake Girl", Dutchcharts.nl – Tori Amos – Cornflake Girl", Charts.nz – Tori Amos – Cornflake Girl", "Tori Amos Chart History (Bubbling Under Hot 100)", "Tori Amos Chart History (Alternative Airplay)", "The ARIA Australian Top 100 Singles 1994", "A Tribute To Tori Amos – Songs Of A Goddess", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cornflake_Girl&oldid=992970020, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles needing additional references from April 2016, All articles needing additional references, Singlechart usages for Canadaadultcontemporary, Singlechart usages for Billboardbubbling100, Singlechart usages for Billboardalternativesongs, Wikipedia articles with MusicBrainz release group identifiers, Wikipedia articles with MusicBrainz work identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, "All the Girls Hate Her/Over It (Piano Suite)", This page was last edited on 8 December 2020, at 02:43. Reminiscent of early Kate Bush, this track will look to alternative and college radio for acceptance first, with rock outlets hopefully responding as well. Analyzing her music is difficult for a number of reasons. The piano cascades, soft percussion, and ghostly chorus set it apart from the plod of Britpop and post-grunge dominating transatlantic charts at the time. I found the rest of your perspective on this song very enlightening, thanks. The protagonist makes it clear that the cornflake girl knew what she was doing, but also notes that the betrayal must have earned the woman some social capital. Professional Widow. The inspiration for "Cornflake Girl" came from Alice Walker's novel Possessing the Secret of Joy, about a young African woman going through the ritual of female circumcision. “Cornflake Girl” is at once personal and universal. Icicle. Sister Janet. Thinks he knows so much Explain your version of song meaning, find more of Tori Amos lyrics. Here. She said Rabbit lives in the great forest half the year with Fox and had noted it was romantic. Don’t stay here and die; leave behind the zombies, the brain dead patriarchal god bullshit betrayals (whatever is evil) and just get the hell out of here. "[11], The song reached number four on the UK Singles Chart and was Amos' most successful international hit at the time. General CommentThis girl is the proverbial doormat. I can kind of how some lines in the song would fit into these meanings, but some lines seem to contradict each other. Inspiration and meaning. Learn how and when to remove this template message, "New Release Summary – Product Available from: 14/2/1994 > Singles (from The ARIA Report Issue No. So anyway, I went back — she was a cornflake girl — anyway, I went back to the back of the bus with this guy, and he was kinda burly and sweaty and gross, but tough, like a young Sylvester Stallone. You bet your life it is It’s a peel out the watchword  Just peel out the watchword. The inspiration for "Cornflake Girl" came from Alice Walker's novel Possessing the Secret of Joy, about a young African woman going through the ritual of female genital mutilation.Amos was angered by the idea that a mother could subject her daughter to such a brutal act, and the song arose as an exploration of the idea of betrayal between women. The Related Products tab shows you other products that you may also like, if you like Cornflake Girl. Amos appeared in a commercial[4] filmed in 1984[5][6] for Kellogg's Just Right, made before her widespread fame. Rabbit is also reminiscent of the White Rabbit in Alice in Wonderland, a character who has the necessary information to help Alice get into the garden. Your email address will not be published. Singer Merry Clayton provided backup singing and sang the "man with the golden gun" bridge. And I go at sleepy time  Seems we got a cheaper feel now  … Cornflakes definition is - toasted flakes made from the coarse meal of hulled corn for use as a breakfast cereal. "[10] Keeley Bolger commented in the 2010 book 1001 Songs You Must Hear Before You Die, that it "could sound depressing in the wrong hands, but Amos's charm conjures up a song that is as otherworldly as its subject. Amos has expressed the belief that we suffer cellular memory from our ancestor’s transgressions and traumas. My guess is that they're spirit animals or different symbolic personas of herself. (The song opens with a jangly string and piano ensemble, followed by a Wild West whistle that underscores the conflict to come). And we had a term for those people, those girls that would turn on you, that wouldn't be there for you, that would maybe expose something you trusted them with, and really let you down - a complete wreckage.  Amos’ father was a pastor of a United Methodist Church, and as a young pianist she would have surely known this song. 992 likes.  In the original hymn, a peal is a loud sound, or chiming of a bell, and a watchword was a code word that shows group membership, as in a secret society or club. Cornflake Girl (Fille Cornflake) L'expression Cornflake girl signifie une prostituée. In interviews she has explained that she and her friends used the term “cornflake girl” to describe a woman who was shallow and untrustworthy, and that alternately a raisin girl is more open-minded, strong, real, and kind. On September 19, 2018, the British band Florence + The Machine released their version of this song, exclusively for Spotify.  In addition to having fun with vocabulary, Amos also has an encyclopedic knowledge of culture, as evidenced by her frequent references to other works of art and literature. "[8] Cashbox wrote, "More painful confessional from Amos, a gifted singer-songwriter with a knack for making childhood pain perfect top-40 fodder.  This accents the idea that the cornflake girl’s actions resulted in a loss for everyone in a situation where cooperation would have been the key to success. Tori Amos is known for her fanatical following, built in large part on her fans’ ability to connect with her messages and to see themselves in her stories.  While most of her songs seem raw and autobiographical, I would argue that she more often writes about characters outside herself, many of whom are archetypal. The single peaked within the top 10 in Ireland[12] and Iceland,[13] and within the top 20 in Australia. I was watching an interview from 2012 where Tori talks about who Rabbit was in the song Cornflake Girl. Tori Amos has said that “Cornflake Girl” is about the cruelty and betrayal that often happens in women’s relationships. In interviews she has explained that she and her friends used the term “cornflake girl” to describe a woman who was shallow and untrustworthy, and that alternately a raisin girl is more open-minded, strong, real, and kind. Or maybe she is  trying to stop herself from doing so. Subject: Meaning of 'Cornflake Girl' lyrics? The woman had earlier played the victim to the cornflake girl and seems a shell of a person; she also seems a substitute for Tori, given they look similar. Amos has referred to the man with the golden gun as a metaphor for God and the Rabbit as a metaphor for Fear. Sugar. Thinks he knows so much; (don’t close this door Rabbit where’d you put the keys girl? Tori Amos has said that “Cornflake Girl” is about the cruelty and betrayal that often happens in women’s relationships. Gone to the other side   Maybe the protagonist is trying to stop another girl from turning against the group. The second, released on January 17, 1994, was a limited edition picture CD housed in a digipak, containing cover versions of the songs "A Case of You" by Joni Mitchell, "If 6 Was 9" by Jimi Hendrix and "Strange Fruit" by Billie Holiday. Cornflake girls are narrowminded and full of prejudice, whereas raisin girls are open to everything. Giving us a yo heave ho Things are getting kind of gross  Amos was angered by the idea that a mother could subject her daughter to such a brutal act, and the song arose as an exploration of the idea of betrayal between women.